Discover your inside story. Save 20% on Ancestry DNA April 21-26

August 21, 2017

Finding a Yorkshire England Ancestor

Recently I discovered a goldmine of information my husband's Yorkshire Elgie ancestors. His Elgie ancestors lived in North Yorkshire, and while researching that area I discovered the North Yorkshire archives website.

A search of the North Yorkshire County Record Office online catalogue using their "Quick Catalogue Search" box resulted in 32 "hits" for the surname Elgie.

Clicking on each one in turn brings up more details, including reference numbers which are needed to order copies of the full document.


Not being able to find an online form or method of ordering documents online I wrote to the
the North Yorkshire Archives (Archives@northyorks.gov.uk) with this email:
Hello
I have found several records for my ELGIE family that I would like to order from your online index of your catalogue.
I was not able to find how to submit my request for copies. I am happy to have digital copies sent by email but I can accept them in any format you use.
There are 5 items - here is one example:
1818 papers for the opinion of the Justices relating to the petitions of John White and William Elgie insolvent debtors [2 items] [North Riding of Yorkshire Quarter Sessions. Easter Quarter Sessions. Document QSB 1818 2/14]

Can I send you a list of document numbers by email to order copies?
Thank you for any help you can offer me.
It didn't take long before I received an email from the North Yorkshire County Record Office with the following information:

If you would like to order copies, payment can be made by cheque payable to North Yorkshire County Council and sent to us at The County Record Office, Malpas Road, Northallerton, North Yorkshire DL7 8TB. We can also accept payment by credit or debit card (except American Express), but we advise that you let us know card details by post or telephone, as we cannot guarantee the security of information sent electronically.  Our telephone number is 01609 777585.
Next I mailed (old school postal) my request along with my credit card information and within a few weeks I had copies of five documents ranging from 1797 to 1822 for the Elgie ancestor of interest. The cost for those five documents was $20.00 Canadian. How amazing is that! And from the documents I learned, among other things, that my husband's 5th great-grandfather William Elgie was in debtor's prison in York when he requested a pardon so he could leave prison and repay his debts.

If you have North Yorkshire ancestors you should give this site a good look.

August 20, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 56R

Netheravon Church. Rector Mr. Chorley

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 46 V

 Newspaper clippings.  1 - Wounded includes Capt. Gatherer.  2 - Canada's Matron, with a dated autograph of 8_1_16
 

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

August 19, 2017

Hans Coenradt & Barentje Straetsman in New Netherland



The exact date of Hans Coenradt’s arrival in New Netherland is not known but we know he would have been among the refugees fleeing Recife Brazil in April 1654. Presumably the family continued on to New Netherland soon after arriving safely in the Netherlands. The first record found indicating he was in New Netherland is dated in Albany (Fort Orange) in early December 1655.  [i] So sometime between April 1654 and December 1655, Hans (and probably his entire family) arrived in New New Netherland.

As New Amsterdam came into view with its gallows and weather beaten wooden houses dominating a raw, windswept landscape, the Barheit family must have had mixed feelings. New Amsterdam in 1654 was a frontier outpost filled with brawling sailors and rough-looking fur traders. Over fifty grog houses catered to a never-ending stream of men dropping in for a little fun on their way to or from Massachusetts or Virginia. [ii]

Many researchers believe that Barentje stayed behind in the Netherlands and arrived in New Netherland for the first time in 1660. Records reveal that Barentje and two children left Amsterdam between 22 December 1659 and 8 January 1660 on board the ship de Trouw. The ship sailed into the harbour at New Amsterdam some time before 6 June 1660.  [iii] However it is unlikely that this was her Barentje’s first trip, since it occurred at least five years after her husband’s arrival. Barentje more than likely returned to the Netherlands on either business reasons or to visit family, and this 1660 arrival is her return voyage.

We find records of Barentje in New Netherland as early as August 1658 when she was called a whore by Pieter Jansen. Her sister defended her vigourously and Pieter took her sister to court in New Amsterdam. [iv] This suggests that the 1660 voyage was not her first time to New Netherland.

The late Pim Nieuwenhuis’ abstracts from notarial documents in the Amsterdam Archives reveal that on 16 August 1659, Barentje was in Amsterdam conducting business on behalf of her sister Teuntje. [v] It seems obvious that Barentje, her legal affairs in order, then booked passage on the next ship to New Netherland – de Trouw leaving after 22 Decemember 1659.

This is an excerpt from my book
 

The Barheit Family Revealed: A Genealogy of Hans Coenradt and Barentje Jans Straetsman, the Immigrant Ancestors of the Barheit Family of Albany New York available  on CreateSpace and Amazon.com

Publication Date: Apr 21 2016
ISBN/EAN13: 1987938062 / 9781987938067
Page Count: 60
Trim Size: 8.5" x 11"
 
[i] CFOB V1.1920 p.242 Hans was called as a witness in a case about stolen sugar cookies
[ii] They Came From Recife: the First Jews to Settle in America 1654. Dr. Kenneth Libo Ph.D and Michael Skakun
[iii] http://olivetreegenealogy.com/ships/nnship77.shtml
[iv] RNA. Vii p 427. 27 August 1658. Pieter Jansen pltf vs Teuntje Straaatmans [sic] deft. Pltf delivers in court certain written complaint for the insults and abuse given him, pltf, by the deft. Deft. Admits having done so, but did not threaten him with a knife, and says the pltf abused her sister for a whore and her as one who steals. Plft denies it and says she, the deft., abused his wife as a thief, and threatened him with a knife, which Leuntje Pieters knows. Deft says the pltf abused her three times in the first instance. Parties charged by the Court to keep themselves quiet and peaceable and whichever of the two should begin again, shall pay 25 gl as a fine to the Schout
[v] NNC. V. 5 No. 3. 2000 p 78. 16 August 1659. Not. H. Schaef, 1359/106. Barentje Straetsmans, housewife of Hans Coenraets from Beerhey, now a free baker near Fort Orange in New Netherland, being a sister of Theuntke [sic] Straetsmans (the wife of Thielman Jacobsz from Caerick who sailed in 1646 on the ship Rhee van Zeeland to Brazil and who died later in Gaudeloupe, now declares in the name of her sister Theuntje Straetsmans now living in Manhattan, that she has received a full account of the wages earned by her late husband. (Note that in fact Thielman had not died in Gaudaloupe and reappeared some years later after Theuntje had remarried as his widow)

August 16, 2017

Mary Facey Elgie Photo Album p 6





"Harry Elgie at Lot 24, Concession 7, East Nissouri. the Will Elgie Farm, now Harry Elgie Farm"

As near as I can tell, the Harry Elgie in this photo is Harry the son of William Elgie and Mary Louise Facey. Harry was born in E. Nissouri in 1907, and married Madge Brown in 1936.



On back of photo is this notation: "Sam and Margaret Facey. Grandpa & Grandma Facey." Underneath is a notation that seems to read "Of Anne Elgie Mitchell"

I am not sure what the second notation refers to, because I only know of two Anne Elgie women - one married Alexander Pelton, the other married Robert Bragg and was the mother of Roberta who inherited these photos from her Aunt Florence.

August 14, 2017

Irish Catholic Church Records Coming Soon!

Good news for those of us searching their Irish Catholic ancestors! The National Library of Ireland has announced that it will give free online access to its archive of Catholic Church records, the earliest of which dates back to the 1700s.

They cover 1,091 parishes throughout Ireland and are mainly baptismal and marriage records.  This new project adds to the over 2.5 million images of Irish births, deaths and marriage records from the General Register Office (GRO),  released online in September 2015. The earlier set of records is available on www.irishgenealogy.ie The records cover births from 1864 to 1915, marriages from 1882 to 1940 and deaths from 1891 to 1965.

Read the full story at All of Ireland’s Catholic Church records to go online

August 13, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 58V

58V Newspaper clipping with photo. "Canadian Nurses in England are going to front". Photo- "Sisters Smellie and Philip". The figures in the background are indicated as "S. Armstrong S. Wishart

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.


I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"


August 11, 2017

Bodies of Swiss Couple Found on Glacier After 75 years

Marcelin and Francine Dumoulin went to milk their cows in a meadow above Chandolin in the Valais canton on August 15, 1942. They left their seven children back at home, expecting to return in a few hours. They never came back.

Their youngest child was 4 years old and it was the first time Francine had gone with her husband. In the past she'd either been pregnant or with a child too young to be left with older siblings.

Searches failed and eventually were called off. The children were farmed out to various relatives and never knew what had happened to their parents.

75 years later, a shrinking glacier revealed the bodies of a man and woman lying near each other, perfectly preserved in ice. Identity papers proved who they were - Marcelin and Francine Dumoulin. Authorities believe they fell into a crevasse and were hidden for decades until melting snow and ice revealed their bodies.

Read the full story at Bodies of Swiss couple found on glacier 75 years after they went missing

Do You Have New Netherland (NY) Ancestors?

If you have New Netherland ancestors, come join us on the New Netherland Settlers Facebook group.

On September 19, 1609, the East India Company ship Halve Maen, commanded by Henry Hudson, an Englishman working for Dutch businessmen who were seeking a passage to the Orient, reached the present-day Albany New York area. 

It was not until 1624 that the first colonists arrived in New Netherland (now New York) to settle at Fort Orange (present day Albany), the mouth of the Connecticut River, and High Island (Burlington Island) in the Delaware River. 

English colonists were in Virginia and Plymouth, and England was claiming the northeastern Atlantic Coast. They both laid claim to Long Island, where the Dutch took hold of the western end and, later, the English settled on the eastern end. 

(Source: http://www.olivetreegenealogy.com/nn/overview.shtml )

August 9, 2017

Mary Facey Elgie Photo Album p 5





A nice photo identified as "Grandpa Facey (Samuel Facey), Mrs. Henry Haves, Mrs Haves (Granny) and Grandma Facey (Margaret Wilford)" 

Redigon Facey, a daughter of Samuel Facey and Margaret Wilford, married Robert Haves and this could be the connection.


This photo is labelled as Jennie Mary (Rennie?) and Margaret Wilford Facey


Search the Free UK Census Records

Announcement from FreeCen:

FreeCEN offers a free-to-search online database of the 19th century UK censuses. Transcribed entirely by volunteers, we have more than 32 million individuals available on our website that anyone can search without having to create an account. The new ‘FreeCEN2’ website (https://freecen2.freecen.org.uk) will launch on Monday 31st July 2017 with all of the records that the current website holds, but with a fresh new look and feel in-line with Free UK Genealogy and FreeREG. 

FreeCEN, FreeREG and FreeBMD are projects by Free UK Genealogy, a registered charity that promotes free access to historical records. FreeREG underwent this process in 2015, and FreeBMD is due to begin its renewal later this year.  

August 7, 2017

Newly Discovered Diary Describes Halifax Explosion


Dec. 6, 1917. Royal Navy sailor Frank Baker wrote in his diary

"We...had just drawn soap and powder and the necessary utensils for cleaning paint work,” he wrote, “when the most awful explosion I ever heard or want to hear again occurred.”

What Baker heard was the largest explosion since before the Atomic Bomb. Sailors 150 miles out to sea heard the blast. On land, people felt the jolt 300 miles away. The shock wave demolished almost everything within a half-mile.


An outbound Belgian ship, the Imo, collided with an inbound French freighter, the Mont-Blanc. The freighter carried 2,925 tons of high explosives, including 246 tons of benzol, a highly flammable motor fuel, in drums lashed to its deck.

Passersby stopped to watch the fire but when the explosion occurred the town of Halifax was devastated. There were 2000 known fatalities and over 9000 people were injured.


Baker's diary is now in an exhibit in the Dartmouth Heritage Musuem. Read the entire diary on the Smithsonian 

August 6, 2017

Nursing Sister Phiips WW1 Photo Album 66 R


66R 2-2 Doctors C.A.M.C. leaving Netheravon for France

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.  

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain. 

The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission. 

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus a number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.  

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos" in the vertical menu bar on the right side of your screen. You can also click on that phrase at the bottom of this post.

Don't Miss Out! Ancestry DNA kits 30% off!

Great news! if you've longed to take a DNA test, or buy some test kits for your relatives so you can figure out that challenging family tree puzzle, now's the time!

Ancestry DNA is 30% off! Starting Sunday, August 6th until Tuesday, August 15th.

I'm stocking up to send some kits to cousins and other assorted relatives. I'll also keep some on hand to offer to descendants of John and Mary McGinnis from Ireland to try to firm up my relationship to that couple.

Read more about DNA discoveries I've already made at DNA Genealogy


August 5, 2017

Genealogists Heads Up re Proposed Bylaw: No Photographs in Cemetery!

Thanks to Murray Pletsch for bringing this to our attention. Polite action is called for - tell them NO!

Cause for Concern...

It has come to our attention that the City of Waterloo in Ontario Canada is considering
implementing a bylaw that would ban photography at all municipal cemeteries.

The proposed bylaw: "Photography: No person shall cause or permit the taking
of any photographic or video imaging within any Cemetery except with the
prior permission of the Manager."


This would mean that as of September 1st, no one would be allowed to take
photographs or video in any municipally owned cemetery operated by the City
of Waterloo without prior permission.

In other words, you could not take a photograph or video of a headstone you
own without prior permission. Or a photograph / video of a loved ones
headstone. Or request that someone take a photograph / video on your behalf
without prior permission. The bylaw does not provide guidelines for granting
or denying permission, only that the manager would decide.

Approval of this bylaw would also set a precedent for other municipalities
in Ontario to follow.

It would have a major impact on genealogy, and not just in terms of projects
like ours (think of the number of cemetery photographs you currently use in
your personal genealogy research!)

There are also multiple businesses and organizations that use cemetery
photographs, including the government.

Luckily there is time to stop this bylaw from being approved, and your help
is need to make this happen.

The bylaw changes were submitted to The Bereavement Authority of Ontario for
approval. The BAO are the ones who ultimately decide if cemetery bylaws will
be approved.

Before September 1st, please take a moment and send them a polite written
message to let them know what you think about this bylaw and how it would
impact you personally.

Bereavement Authority of Ontario
Email: info@thebao.ca
Telephone: 647-483-2645
Toll Free: 844-493-6356
Fax: 647-748-2645
Mail: Bereavement Authority of Ontario, 100 Sheppard Avenue East, Suite 505,
Toronto, ON M2N 6N5

Need more info? The cemetery bylaws were discussed by the City of Waterloo
Council at their July 24th meeting. A copy of the agenda can be read here:
http://www.waterloo.ca/en/calendar/council/Details.aspx?Id=d11b5d9f-7c1a-4326-9fde-8369970131fa

The proposed cemetery bylaws are on pages 101-177, the clause regarding
photography is on page 113.

101 Best Genealogy Sites from Family Tree Magazine

Olive Tree Genealogy is very excited and honored to be chosen as one of Family Tree Magazine's Top 101 Genealogy sites for 2017.

Olive Tree Genealogy was chosen in the category Big Genealogy Websites along with FamilySearch, Heritage Quest, Access Genealogy, Library of Congress, NARA, Rootsweb and US GenWeb. Wow! I'm super thrilled to be in such esteemed company!




This is what Family Tree Magazine said about my site:


Each year, Family Tree Magazine publishes the 101 Best Websites for family history to guide genealogists to the top websites where they can make family history research progress, and to honor the individuals and organizations who create those sites. This year, they focused on websites that provide genealogy information and records free to researchers.

The full list of 101 Best Websites, including my site, can also be found at http://www.familytreemagazine.com/article/best-big-genealogy-websites-2017

August 4, 2017

Update of Canadian WW1 Personnel Files Online

Attestation Papers WW1 CEF
The Canadian Expeditionary Force WW1 database has been updated and now includes full files of soldiers up to Box 7834 and last name Pilkey.

To date 461,575 of 640,000 files are available online for researchers to freely use.

August 2, 2017

Mary Facey Elgie Photo Album p 4

This photo is labelled "taken 1914" and the individuals are identified as "Fred & Annie (Facey) Rogers at Grandpa Facey's Farm"  The reference to Grandpa Facey refers to Samuel Facey (1857-1930), my mother-in-law's grandfather.



This photo is of my husband's great-grandparents Mary and William Elgie, and their daughters Florence (1914-1996), Annie (1912-1979) and Luella (1917-2009). Luella was my husband's grandmother. Annie married Robert Bragg and she was the mother of Roberta who passed this family treasure trove on to my husband's mother. The box was found in Florence's home after she died in 1996.

July 31, 2017

How to Find a WW1 Soldier

WW1 Training Camp
Sharlene K. asked

what would you have regarding a Michigan born citizen going to Canada and enlisting in WWI, serving in England, marrying in 1919 and returning with a war bride and her daughter....how would I go about sorting this all out....he was enlisted in the 15 Scotish Rifle Brigade/
Olive Tree Genealogy answer:

Hi Sharlene,

You have lots of clues in your query, and this is what I would do:

1. Search the online CEF (Canadian Expeditionary Force) database for your ancestor in WW1. If found, that will provide you with details as to his service during the War

2. You don't say where he married in 1919 - was it in Michigan, Canada, or England. If in Ontario Canada, marriage records for 1919 are available on Ancestry.com If he married in Michigan, marriages for that year are available on Ancestry.com (images) and on FamilySearch (index only). Lastly if he married in England you should check FreeBMD. 

3. Since you mention a War Bride I'm guessing he married in England. You should be able to find them coming to Canada on a ship by searching  immigration records on Ancestry.com

4. You might want to search for the war diaries of the 15 Scotch Rifle Brigade. You can do this on Library and Archives Canada 

July 30, 2017

Nursing Sister Philps WW1 Photo Album 52 V

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.



The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

July 28, 2017

Are You Your Own Grandpa or Grandma?

Today I had an interesting genealogy find ...my son's 5th great-grandfather's sister Sarah Stead was a witness at my son's wife 's 4th great-grandmother's marriage in 1817 in Ramsgate, Kent, England.

Since my daughter-in-law's 4th great grandma was a Fuller born in Ramsgate and we descend from a line of Fuller in Ramsgate back to the 1700s, it would not surprise me if eventually I find that my son and his wife are "cousins"

Believe it or not, this is not unusual. I use FTM for my preferred Genealogy program. One day out of sheer boredom I ran a kinship report and was shocked to learn that my father was also my cousin.

To be exact, my father is listed as my father AND as


my 8th cousin once removed
my 9th cousin once removed
my 11th cousin once removed
my 10th cousin twice removed
the husband of my 5th cousin once removed

Phew!

I was stunned. And confused. I knew what once removed meant - that we were a generation apart. Okay so far. Being 8th cousins meant we shared a common 7th great-grandparent. Being 9th cousins meant we shared a common 8th great-grandparent, and so on.

"husband of my 5th cousin once removed"? Well that meant my mother was my 5th cousin once removed and that she and I shared a common 4th great grandparent.

It wasn't making sense to me, as of course my parents and I share common ancestors! But how did we get to be cousins as well as father-daughter? This sent me off to have a good look at how my relationship to my father became a cousin relationship too.

It's a bit confusing but here is how it happened beginning with my father's 3rd great grandparents, Cornelius Vollick and Eve Larroway who married in 1795.

Cornelius and Eve shared two sets of common 2nd great grandparents. That is, Cornelius' great great grandparents were Jochem & Eva (Vrooman) Van Valkenburg. So were Eve's. Cornelius' other set of great great grandparents were Pierre & Cornelia (Damen) Uzielle. So were Eve's.

Two of Jochem & Eva's grandchildren (through their son Isaac and daughter Jannetje) married two grandchildren of Pierre Uziele and Cornelia Damen.

The Van Valkenburg grandchildren were Isaac Van Valkenburg (who married Maria Bradt the daughter of Storm Bradt and Sophia Uziele) and Marytje Van Alstyne who married Petrus LeRoy the son of Maria Uziele (who was Sophia's sister!) and Leonard Le Roy.

Here's a chart which might show the relationships in a less confusing way

I'll go into my mother's line and that tangled web of cousinship on another day.

The confusing relationships reminded me of I'm My Own Grandpaw a song written about a man who, through a combination of marriages, becomes stepfather to his own stepmother — that is, he becomes his own grandfather. Am I my own Grandma? My grandchildren love hearing how they are my cousins as well as my grandchildren....

July 26, 2017

Mary Facey Elgie Photo Album p 3

 

On this album page we have a photo identified as the silo on William Elgie's farm which was Lot 24, Concession 9, East Nissouri Ontario


On the same page in the album is this photo labelled Mary & Hugh Finch [with] daughter Ethel. Friends of Facey family at St. Mary's

A search of the 1921 census for St. Mary's finds Hugh Finch age 60, wife Mary age 48 and daughter Ethel 27 years old, along with son William 19 and daughter Irma age 10 . Based on the appearance of Hugh and Mary in this photo, and their clothing, I am fairly certain this photo was taken in the mid 1920s which means the young girl identified as Ethel cannot be correct. I suspect this is their daughter Irma who is age 10 in the 1921 census. 

July 24, 2017

Rescued Letter to Donald Morgan of New York 1943


This is another rescued document from Davis Kennels in Joliet Illinois to Donald E. Morgan of Clay New York dated August 30, 1943.

Davis Kennels (Wm. A. Davis) is informing Mr. Morgan about their black, white, and tan Bassett pups.

Thanks to Annette P. for sending this document to Olive Tree Genealogy for publication

July 23, 2017

Nursing Sister Philips WW1 Photo Album 6R

This Photo Archive consists of a small autograph album (6.5" by 5.25") kept by Constance (Connie) Philips as a memento of her time serving as a nurse during World War One.

The majority of the photos and items are from 1915, when she served as a nurse in France and Britain.



The album and all photographs, postcards, and other ephemera contained in the album belong to Karin Armstrong and may not be copied or republished without her written permission. The images will be published on Olive Tree Genealogy with permission.

Each image has been designated an "R" for Recto or a "V" for Verso plus an album page number. Recto is the right-hand side page of a bound book while Verso is the left-hand side page.

I will be posting the entire album and my additional research on the individuals identified in Connie's album over the coming months so please check back frequently to view these historic photos. The easiest way to see what has been published is to click on the topic "Nursing Sister WW1 Photos"

Are You a Vrooman Descendant? My New Book is Out!

Just published! My latest book in my New Netherland setttlers series - on the Vrooman family of New York. 

New Netherland Settlers: The Vrooman Family: Ancestors & Descendants of the Brothers Hendrick Meesen Vrooman, Pieter Meesen Vrooman and Jacob Meesen Vrooman of New Netherland (New York) (Volume 8 of the New Netherland Settlers series) Available on Amazon.com

The three brothers Hendrick Meesen Vrooman, Pieter Meesen and Jacob Meesen came from the Netherlands who came to New Netherland in the early part of the 17th century. Pieter arrived circa 1655, and he and Jacob settled in Albany. Hendrick settled first at Kinderhook, then Steen Raby and finally Schenectady in 1677.

This book traces the Vrooman ancestry back to the brothers' great-great grandfather Gerrit Jans Kerstantsz born in Holland circa 1457, and follows the family down 5 generations.

8.5x11" 56 pages

July 21, 2017

George Wormald, Miner in the Aldwarke Main Colliery in Yorkshire

Sheffield Independent - Wednesday 12 June 1895
George Wormald had no idea when he went to work on June 10, 1895 that would be his last day on earth. George was 38 years old, a miner in the Aldwarke Main Colliery in Yorkshire, and the father of eight children ages 2 to 15.

Early that morning, George kissed his wife and children goodbye and headed off for what he thought would be just another day working with coal.

Having worked in the mines for 19 years, George was well aware of the dangers and knew how to keep himself safe. Early that morning George placed his lunch and his extra clothing in his usual spot, then realized he needed a piece of chalk to mark his tubs. It was 9 a.m. when George approached a workmate, William Banks to ask if he had any extra. 


Without warning a roof above them collapsed and almost 5 tons of coal fell on the men. George was able to crawl out far enough to get his head out from under the rocks and the other workers were able to dig both men out within a few minutes.

William suffered a broken leg but George died a few minutes after being rushed to the local doctor, crushed by the weight of the coal.

 George was my son's 2nd great-grandfather.

Kate Wormald, daughter of George and my son's great-grandmother. She was 11 years old when her father was killed. 





July 19, 2017

Mary Facey Elgie Photo Album p 2

This is a lovely casual outdoor photo probably taken in the early 1920s at William Facey's farm. William aka Will (1884-1958) was the brother of Mary Louise Facey Elgie. He was married to Edith Wiseman and we see the name Edith on the reverse of the photo.

On the reverse we find identifications but it is challenging to know what names go with what individual. 


July 18, 2017

Excerpt from Death Finds a Way: A Janie Riley Mystery

A few of the many reviews of Death Finds a Way: A Janie Riley Mystery:

"Reading this book was like curling up on the couch with a good friend." Shani M.

"...some surprising twists enhanced the story line and offered some surprises. It should be noted that even a non genealogist would enjoy this mystery. Lorine McGinnis Schulze has produced a great first time mystery book and I am looking forward to future Janie Riley stories." Dianne S.

"Being a genealogist and knowing many of the things talked about and places visited made reading this book a lot of fun. Can't wait for the next one to come out!! " Cathy N. 

 "I loved this book and couldn't put it down!"

"Death Finds a Way" kept me engaged with the story right to the end." Susan



Excerpt from Chapter One

The Steamer Baltic, April 5, 1878

Sixteen-year-old Katie shivered in the cool morning air and pulled her woolen cloak tighter as she nudged her brother. Tendrils of glossy blue-back hair escaped from her hood and she impatiently pushed them back. “Joey!” a soft cry escaped Katie’s lips. “Look! That must be New York!” Brother and sister were standing on the deck of the ship that had brought them from Queenstown Ireland. The bow plunged through the murky water and the shoreline loomed closer. “Finally,” muttered Joey, “I can hardly wait to get off this damn thing and on to solid ground again!”

The passage had not been an easy one. Joey had been ill for most of the voyage across the Atlantic. They were both happy to be on deck where the smell of salt air filled their nostrils. Being stuck below in steerage was miserable. Katie wasn’t sure she would ever get the smell of urine, vomit, and other body waste out of her nostrils. Babies with colic screamed long into the night, hungry children cried for hours, and passengers who were sick moaned and retched with horrible gagging noises. Women cried out in fear on hearing the ship groan and creak as its wooden hull protested with every wave that hit. Katie had taken to wrapping her cloak around her ears at night so that the dreadful sounds were muffled.
She shivered again, partially from the cold and partially from nerves. They were starting a new life in a foreign country. She remembered vividly the day Joey came in from the fields and she had to tell him that their beloved ma was gone. Pa had died of the fever just a few months before and their ma had followed not long after.

Now here they were here in a city where they knew no one. Joey had a few pounds to see them through until they could find work but Katie was terrified it would not be enough. She hoped that the emigration agent had been telling the truth when he said jobs were there for the taking in New York City. She prayed she could find a position as a maid or downstairs kitchen girl in a good home, while Joey figured that with his strong muscles and young back he’d work on the docks or help in a stable. He was good with horses and even though he was only 18, no one knew more about gentling or taming a horse than he did. 

The cool wind had reddened Katie’s cheeks and they felt numb. She was glad the bad weather had finally lifted and she had something to look at besides waves and gray water. The sun was just coming up and Katie imagined she could feel a slight warmth from it already. She could hear the cries of gulls overhead, this sign of land bringing comfort to her.

Joey nudged her. “Katie, look! I think we’re coming into the harbor.” He pointed to an island on one side, mainland on the other and the narrowing gap of water between them. Their excitement, coupled with apprehension, built. What would happen now? How long would it take to get off the ship, find their baggage, and get on their way? But on their way where? Katie reminded herself that they did not have a place to stay or employment waiting for them.  

She saw that they were heading to the island and soon they were anchored. Passengers were told to gather on the deck while officials undertook a quick inspection of their hair and mouths. Joey whispered that these were Health Inspectors checking for disease. Anyone who was found in an unhealthy state would be kept in quarantine. An hour later, the inspection was over and a few sobbing women and young children had been taken away. Katie silently said a grateful thank you for not being one of those rejected.

The ship was once again heading away from the island and Katie could see a large circular building up ahead. When the ship anchored, other officials came on board and began checking each passenger’s baggage. More hours passed and Katie felt faint from hunger. The bit of bread and meat she’d eaten at last night’s supper was gone from her stomach, and it was now long past their usual breakfast time.  Joey kept reassuring her that they were fine, it was almost over and soon they’d be on their way but she was beginning to doubt it.

Finally the exhausted passengers were herded into smaller boats. She clung tightly to Joey’s sleeve, terrified that in the crush of milling bodies they’d be separated. Joey thrust a small piece of bread and some money into her hand “Take this,” he whispered fiercely, “and if we get separated, find a spot where carriages come, and wait for me there. I’ll find you.”
With trembling hands, Katie stuffed the money into the pocket of her full skirt, where it nestled beside the embroidered hanky her ma had given her for her last birthday.
“Joey, I’m scared!” Katie’s voice shook slightly.

What happens to Katie and Joey? What adventures await them? Find out in the genealogical mystery novel "Death Finds a Way: A Janie Riley Mystery" available on Amazon.com and Amazon.ca as a Paperback or E-Book

Visit my author website for details of my upcoming book in this series - "A Grave Secret"